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VILLAGER TheIssue 4 - July 2018and TownLifeLOCAL NEWS ã LOCAL PEOPLE ã LOCAL SERVICES ã LOCAL CHARITIES ã LOCAL PRODUCTSIn this issue Win tickets toMeraki…
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VILLAGER TheIssue 4 - July 2018and TownLifeLOCAL NEWS • LOCAL PEOPLE • LOCAL SERVICES • LOCAL CHARITIES • LOCAL PRODUCTSIn this issue Win tickets toMeraki Festival The Invention ofPhotography Win £25in our Prize CrosswordBringing Local Business to Local People Your FREE local magazine covering Hitchin, Great and Little Wymondley, St Ippolyts, Charlton and surrounding areas every month To advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 261122rE E R pyu o YF co1The Old White Horse • 1 High Street • Biggleswade • SG18 0JE Tel: 01767 314344 www.lolineinteriors.co.uk e: dave@lolineinteriors.co.uk 2Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsInside this issue...Win Tools to make Gardening Easier12The Invention of Photography....................................................4 Wines: More Gems of Austria.....................................................8 Win Tickets to Meraki Festival..................................................10 Win Tools to make Gardening Easier.........................................12 Garden Tools.............................................................................14 Mauritius - Natural World.........................................................17 Steps to a Healthier Heart........................................................19 Take Control of your Electronic Inbox........................................20 Beauty and the Beach..............................................................22 Tips for a Formal or Black Tie Summer Event............................25How to Save Money on your Summer Holiday this Year............28 Stretch Benefits........................................................................31 Feeling Fruity...........................................................................35 Plastered..................................................................................37 Essential Scent.........................................................................39 Laparoscopic Spays..................................................................40 Should you Buy an Aitomatic Car?............................................42 Mediation: Marvellous Medicure or New Age Fad?...................44 Nick Coffer’ Weekend Recipe.....................................................47 Puzzle Page..............................................................................48 What’s On.................................................................................50 Fun Quiz...................................................................................53 Dwile Flonking with the Devil and his Tailors...........................54 Prize Crossword........................................................................58 Book Review............................................................................61Steps to a Healthier Heart19Get your business off to a flying start this yearAdvertise with the Villager Magazine... prices start from just £25.00 +VAT per month Editorial - Catherine Rose, Trevor Langley, Tracey Anderson, Solange Hando, Louise Addison, Lisa Calder, Kate Duggan, Jennie Billings, Ann Haldon, Sarah Davey, Rachael Leverton, Pippa Greenwood, Berry House Vets, Tom Wiltshire, Kate McLelland and Nick CofferAdvertising Sales/Local Editorial Nigel Frost • Tel 01767 261122 nigel@villagermag.com Photography - Kieren Welch Design and Artwork Design 9 • Tel 07762 969460 • www.design9marketing.co.ukPublishers Villager Publications Ltd 24 Market Square, Potton, Bedfordshire SG19 2NP Tel: 01767 261122 Email: nigel@villagermag.com www.villagermag.comDisclaimer - All adverts and editorial are printed in good faith, however, Villager Publications Ltd can not take any responsibility for the content of the adverts, the services provided by the advertisers or any statements given in the editorial. No part of this publication may be reproduced or stored without the express permission of the publisher.To advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 2611223HistoryBy Catherine RoseLight Drawing The Invention of Photography With summer finally here, many of us will be going on our annual holidays. Growing up, a camera was always on our family packing list to capture those happy holiday moments and the scenery of foreign shores. Nowadays, cameras in smart phones are so advanced that most of us already carry around the means to record our lives in our pocket. But how did photography come out of the darkroom? Before a way to permanently capture an image was invented, the forerunner to photography was the camera obscura, Latin for ‘dark room’. Discovered in 1600 (or probably earlier), an upside down, back-to-front image of the outside world can be projected onto a wall in a darkened room through a pinhole aperture. During the Renaissance, it was found that the effect could be replicated by using a box – the first ‘pinhole camera’ – with mirrors employed to reflect the image so that it was the right way round.4The first physical photograph, based on the camera obscura, was taken in 1825 by Frenchman Joseph Nicéphore Niépce. The result, ‘View from a Window at Le Gras’, is very grainy and took around eight hours to develop. Niépce did it by coating a pewter plate with bitumen of Judea, which hardens when exposed to light. He then placed it in a camera obscura. When the unhardened parts of the bitumen were washed away, it left a negative image on the plate from which a print could be made. He called the process heliography (sun drawing). But it was in 1839 that photography is said to have truly been born with the invention of the daguerreotype process by Louis Daguerre, a scenery artist and friend of Niépce who had inherited his notes on the latter’s death in 1833. Using a glass plate coated with light-reactive silver iodide, the image was developed with the aid of mercury vapour. Unlike heliography, the daguerreotype requiredPlease mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsTo advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 2611225only minutes of exposure rather than hours. The image was later fixed onto the plate with a hot salt solution. Although still a negative, because it was silver on glass, it appeared as a positive image when viewed from the right angle. Photography, Greek for ‘drawing with light’, was unveiled to the world that same year and the daguerreotype became the first commercially viable process. There are numerous portraits taken at this time, some astonishingly clear, such as the self-portrait by Robert Cornelius, often claimed to be the “first portrait photograph ever taken”, and John Draper’s wonderful study of his sister Dorothy wearing an early 19th century decorated bonnet. At around the same time in England, Henry Fox Talbot had already created photographic negatives on paper using silver chloride but, much like Niepce’s heliography, the images took several hours to expose. Talbot began to develop it further, culminating in his invention of the calotype process (Greek for ‘beautiful picture’). Unlike the daguerreotype which formed a single image on a glass plate, one calotype negative could be used to produce unlimited prints. Talbot’s ‘silver halide’ was the foundation for wet film technology that has endured until the present day. In 1851, the wet collodian process was introduced by Frederick Archer, which used glass negatives printed onto albumen paper. This process could capture sharp images faster than ever before, with the advantage that one lightsensitised plate could fit up to eight prints. It soon became the universal method for producing carte-de-visites (photographic calling cards), tintypes (small inexpensive portraits printed onto thin sheets of black enamelled iron) and ambrotypes (like daguerreotypes in that they were printed onto glass). Renowned Victorian photographers like Lewis Carroll and Julia Margaret Cameron used this process to produce their remarkable studies. Its drawbacks were that plates had to be prepared and used immediately, and it remained difficult to capture movement without the image being blurred. 1871 saw the beginning of modern photography with the advent of the6dry plate. Coated with silver salts suspended in gelatin rather than collodian solution, it was sixty times more sensitive and meant that handheld cameras could be used without the need for a stabilising tripod. In 1888, George Eastman made the first commercial camera available to the general public – the Kodak. Under the slogan: ‘You press the button, we do the rest’, the camera came with a roll of flexible film – initially paper and later transparent nitrocellulose – which, following exposure, could be sent to one of Kodak’s printing facilities. Although there had been early experiments with colour photography, most notably James Maxwell’s tartan ribbon of 1855, photographs remained black and white, with colour only achieved by hand-tinting. The first colour photography appeared when the Lumiere brothers invented their Autochrome process in 1907, which used panchromatic emulsion. Although it didn’t become a commercial success, some of the images it achieved are stunning, such as the 1913 ‘Portraits of Christina’ by Mervyn O’Gorman (The Royal Photographic Society) – a series of colour photos of a young girl identified only recently as 16-year-old Christina Bevan. The invention of Kodachrome colour film in 1935 meant that colour photographs were well and truly on their way. But just as some artists falsely believed the advent of photography meant an end to painting, so black and white photographs, with an artistic and often edgy interpretation of their subject, have remained popular even in the new era of digital photography.Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsPersonal, caring and independent. The complete funeral service 24 2 4 hhour our sservice ervice•Private P i C Chapels h l off R Rest•Memorial Stonemasons•Funeral Plans•Own Crematorium ST E V E N AG E • 01438 316623 H I T CH I N • 01462 438422 KN E B WO RT H • 01438 812365 B U N T I N G F O R D • 01763 274111 WELWYN GARDEN CITY • 01707 390018 W E LW Y N • 01438 714686 H E RT F O R D • 01992 582052 WA R E • 01920 468551 LE T C H WO RT H • 01462 684292www.austins.co.ukHarwood ParkThe perfect setting to commemorate the life of your loved oneCrematorium and memorial gardens created and managed by the Austin family in the beautiful Hertfordshire countryside.www.crematorium.co.ukServing the local community for ten generationsTo advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 2611227Food and DrinkWines:More Gems of Austria I continued my quest, searching for Austrian wines that have been recognised and acknowledged with awards, for their qualities, plus wines that, in my opinion, deserve to be.Weingut Forstreiter is located in Krems-Hollenburg, a traditional wine growing village of the Kremstal region. The Forstreiter family has been producing wine since 1868. Forstreiter Grüner Veltliner Ried Kremser Kogl and Grüner Veltliner Tabor Kremstal Reserve are both extremely popular, classic productions. These splendid white wines have most pleasant bouquets. Both possess a good balance, with tropical fruit flavours, very acceptable mouthfeel and lengthy palate sensations. Forstreiter Riesling Schotter is balanced and refreshing. This great, dry, white wine, is chosen regularly for many dining occasions and is excellent for the mouth’s pleasures and on to the palate. These wines are wonderful accompaniments to a lot of cuisine, including fish, seafood, plus white meats and are just a selection of the Forstreiter white wines. Their ranges include outstanding reds, too. www.forstreiter.at Anton Bauer produces superb white and red wines. As the company says, “The wines are with soul”, every year. For my ‘wines of choice’ I selected the powerful Zweigelt and the Wagram Reserve Zweigelt Alte Reben productions. Dark fruits are very much displayed for the bouquets and lead, enticingly, to the mouthfeel and splendid palate sensations. Wonderful with red meats, etc. For a sweeter choice I found Kracher, that produces a fantastic range of wines. Burgenland Beerenauslese Cuvée ‘hit the spot’, for me. Absolutely divine, when a sweet wine is called for. The bouquet brings delight, plus the mouthfeel and palate will not be disappointed with this production, having luscious fruits in abundance. For all details of the full ranges www.antonbauer.at and www.kracher.at The Top Selection Company sources high-quality wines, spirits, plus drinks, from global origins and offers an exceptional portfolio. Their wines and other beverages can be located in top hotels and restaurants, plus many retailers. Top Selection also offers a complete service, including advice about cuisine pairings and winery visits, etc. www. topselection.co.ukAs always, Enjoy!ey Trevor Langl8Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsTo advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 2611229All SaintsPixie LottJudge JulesWin 2 Tickets to Meraki Festival Meraki is back! We’re announcing our 2018 music lineup in the lead up to the festival and it’s already obvious that we’ve kicked things up a notch! We have two festival music stages filled with incredible artists, from global superstars like All Saints, Pixie Lott, Nik Kershaw and 10cc, to national and local favourites like Boogie Storm, Simon McBride and Annabel Williams. We also have an assortment of amazing activities which you can pack into your days at Meraki - these include: Europe’s largest outdoor waterslide, swimming pools, roller disco, caving, free massage, face painting, kids comedy & theatre and much, much more. Our All-Inclusive Tickets mean that once you’re through the gates, you don’t have to pay for any of our festival activities - you can enjoy all of your favourite parts of the festival and not pay a penny more – just focus on having a great time and creating magical summer memories! And for those of you who like to hear your tunes blasting off a set of decks, The House of Neon dance tent will be pumping out party classics each night with a stellar lineup of DJs that includes legends like Judge Jules, Danny Rampling, Tall Paul, and Seb Fontaine. Whether you come and camp for a long weekend, join us an amazing day or grab an evening ticket and party with us for one night only - we look forward to seeing you in August for an incredible festival filled with Meraki summer fun! To be in with a chance to win 2 tickets to Meraki Festival simply send your entry by 16th July 2018 to: Meraki Festival, Villager Publications Ltd, 24 Market Square, Potton, Beds SG19 2NP The winner will be drawn randomly.MERAKI FESTIVAL COMPETITION ENTRYFor a chance to win 2 tickets to Meraki Festival simply complete your details below and post your response by 16th July 2018 to: Meraki Festival Competition, Villager Publications Ltd, 24 Market Square, Potton, Beds SG19 2NP. Name:Don’t want to leave it to chance? For the full line-up and to book tickets go to merakifestival.comAddress:Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to adverts Tel: Email: 10Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsA great day out for the whole family! Home to over 200 animals and birds, children’s playground, tractor trailer rides, flying displays, animal meet and greats, crazy golf and more. All included in the admission - Adult £12.50 Senior £11.50 Child (3-15 years) £9.50 Family (2 adults & 2 children) £34.50 and children under 3 years are free. Bedfordshire Food & Garden Festival - 7th & 8th July A great day our for all you foodies plus inspiration for all you gardeners. Adult £6.00 Senior £5.00 Child (3-15 years) £2.50 Includes admission into the activity farm and bird of prey centre. Herrings Green Activity Farm, Wilstead MK45 3DT www.birdsofpreycentre.co.uk Tel: 01234 742362 / 01234 742766 The Family Farm - Open 7 days a week 10.00 - 6.00GARDEN WALK & TALKThe cost of your tour includes a hot beverage, scone, cream and jam for just £12.503RD JULY 2018, 2 - 3.30PMCome and learn more about our gardens and how you can create the perfect outdoor spaceSEE HOW WE GROW CEREALS, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW YOU CAN GROW YOUR VERY OWN VEG OR FLOWER PATCH IDEAS ON HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT WILDLIFE IN YOUR OWN GARDENSTO BOOK:Email: dawn.walton@jordansmill.com or online at: www.jordansmill.com/eventsWHY NOT FOLLOW US ON: /JORDANSMILL @JORDANSMILLTo advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 261122WWW.JORDANSMILL.COMJordans Mill, Holme Mills, Langford Road Broom, Nr Biggleswade SG18 9JY Call: 01767 60394011Win Tools to MakeGardening Easier Win top quality carbon steel garden tools plus a gift voucher, together worth over £100.At Bickerdikes you’ll find a huge selection of best quality plants: flowers, vegetables, trees, shrubs and turf. If you are new to gardening the Bickerdike team’s friendly, welcoming, professional and practical advice will ensure you plant the right plant in the right place. What’s more, hardy plants are guaranteed for two years providing they are planted and cared for correctly. For well over 80 years the Bickerdike family have been in the horticultural industry. Following the family tradition Mark and Debbie Bickerdike opened Bickerdikes Garden Centre in 1999, applying the same principles as previous generations of the family: quality, choice, value for money and above all personal service. The Bickerdikes service extends to their carry to car assistance and free delivery for larger items if you spend £15 or more. Plus the Bickerdikes Reward Card scheme means that every time you make a purchase you’ll earn points towards future purchases. Once you’ve browsed all the plants, containers and pots, tools and equipment, plant feeds and fertilisers, garden furniture, huge range of gifts and gift food you’ll be ready to visit Norton’s Café. Pop in for coffee or a light snack or maybe lunch. There’s a full menu all day starting with breakfast and there’s waitress service too.CompetitionBICKERDIKES COMPETITION ENTRY Name: Tel: QUESTION...How much do you need to spend to get free delivery for larger items?Answer the question below to be in with a chance to win a compete set of seven Wilkinson Sword carbon steel garden tools, all with a five-year guarantee: (hand fork and trowel, garden rake and lawn rake, digging spade, digging fork and Dutch hoe) plus a £20 voucher to spend at Bickerdikes. (Please note the wheelbarrow is not part of the prize.) To enter, complete the form below and send to: Bickerdikes Competition, Villager Publications Ltd, 24 Market Square, Potton, Bedfordshire SG19 2NP. The winner will be picked at random. Deadline: 16th July 2018Email: Address: 12Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to advertsTo advertise in The Villager and Town Life please call 01767 26112213Time of YearGarden Toys Gardens are a great place for kids to run around and get that all important fresh air and exercise. The addition of a toy or two will mean you can keep them happily occupied for hours. Swings are perennially popular. Make sure the size and style is appropriate to the age of the child. Better still buy one which has changeable seats so you can upgrade as the child grows, or simply ring the changes now and then. Slides come in all sizes. They can be independent structures or attached to climbing frames. You really do get what you pay for in this instance. Do your homework. Is a metal or wooden frame best for your garden. How much use will it get and how many and what ages of children does it need to support? Get the best you can afford and it will serve you for many years. Trampolines are a relative newbie to the UK garden compared with slides and swings but they are rightfully popular. Even adults can’t resist them. You’ll need a flat surface, and a safety net is highly recommended. Most t
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