Complete Test Bank for Personality Psychology Foundations and Findings 1st Edition by Miserandino

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CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANKTEST BANKTest Bank for Personality Psychology Foundations and Findings 1st Edition by MiserandinoCLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST…
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CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANKTEST BANKTest Bank for Personality Psychology Foundations and Findings 1st Edition by MiserandinoCLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANKCLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition2 Personality Traits: A Good Theory WHAT IS A PERSONALITY TRAIT? Two Approaches to the Study of Personality Traits WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PERSONALITY FROM THE IDIOGRAPHIC APPROACH? Studying Individual Personalities: The Idiographic Approach The Idiographic Approach Applied: The Case of Jenny WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PERSONALITY FROM THE Nomothetic APPROACH? Finding Universals: The Nomothetic Approach The Theoretical Approach The Lexical Approach The Measurement Approach RESEARCH METHODS ILLUSTRATED: FACTOR ANALYSIS THE GREAT NOMOTHETIC SEARCH FOR UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLES OF PERSONALITY Three Superfactors: Eysenck Five Factors: The Big Five and the Five Factor Model A Rose by Any Other Name? Two Models of the Five Factors Is Five Really the Ultimate Answer to Life, The Universe, and Everything? A One Factor Solution Six and Seven Factor Solutions . . . and Beyond THEN AND NOW: THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS AND THE FIVE FACTORS THE PERSONALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE: WHAT CAN YOU TELL ABOUT SOMEONE FROM HIS OR HER LIVING SPACE? CHAPTER SUMMARY REVIEW QUESTIONS KEY TERMSLecture and Discussion Ideas 1. Have students describe someone they know well using dynamic traits, temperament traits, and ability traits. 2. Have students generate examples, either as a class, in small groups, or alone, for the 4 levels of traits (type, trait, habits, responses) using Eysenck’s PEN theory.Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.16CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition3. Intriguing additional studies to present to class include: Rentfrow, Gosling, and Potter, (2008) or Rentfrow (2010). Both articles link scores on the five factors to geography and include fascinating graphics. Based on this work, have students discuss where their ideal place to live would be and why (see below for the location of interactive maps illustrating their findings online).Active Learning Ideas 1. Case Study Illustrating A Trait Model Write a case study of a character from literature, TV, movies, or real life using one of the trait models presented in the textbook. 2. Case Study: Nelson Mandella Much is known about the life and character of Nelson Mandella. Students can study materials online, including documentaries to complete a personality profile of this most interesting and impacting individual. For the full description of how to utilize this obituary as a case study of the five factors see Miserandino (2007). 3. Human Factor Analysis If students have described themselves using trait terms (see Lecture and Discussion Idea #2 in Chapter 1), they can write their responses on small pieces of scrap paper (e.g., post it notes) and conduct a human factor analysis of papers. That is, working in pairs, instruct students to group traits into factors by similarity (e.g., outgoing, sociable, party-animal) including antonyms (e.g., nervous, calm) on the same factor. Then have the pairs team up with other pairs to consolidate their factors. Next, have groups continue to consolidate their factors into the least number of factors possible. How many factors do student need to account for all the traits in the class? How would you name the factors? Do the factors obtained make sense? For example, at my school we had many psychology majors who were also pre-physical therapy majors. Our first factor was often a “Psychology Major” factor (warm, outgoing, empathetic, cares about people) and the second factor was a “Pre-Med” factor (cynical, logical, organized, driven). Segrist and Pawlow (2007) describe a similar activity using items from a personality questionnaire. They lead students into a discussion around how students decided which group to join, what happens when a student could fit into more than one group, what items caused the most difficulty, etc., leading directly into a discussion of factor analysis, including the benefits and criticisms of the technique.Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.17CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition4. Exploring The Dichotomy of the Five Factors The September 2007 Tiagi Game Letter (providing “Seriously fun activities for trainters, facilitators, performance consultants, and managers”, see their website http://www.thiagi.com/) features a game to help people see both sides of an issue. This is a good way to help students see that both ends of the five factors are within the range of normal personality and to help them appreciate what people at the both ends of the continuum are like. Working in groups of three, students must present the advantages and disadvantages of being at one end or the other on one of the five factors (i.e., Neurotic, Extraverted, Open, Agreeable, Conscientious vs. Emotionally stable, Introverted, Conventional, Disagreeable, and Disorganized) to their teammates. The third person acts as a judge assigning 13 points between the two presenters based on how persuasive they were. Rotate roles until all five factors are discussed. 5. Behavioural Checklist of the Five Factors Stephen Dollinger (2004) describes an activity in which students answer questions and fill out a measure of the five-factor model. Instructors then calculate correlations between each behavior and trait. Students attempt to predict the class’s responses to the behavior checklist based on their standings on the five-factor model. The activity illustrates the five-factor model, type I and type II errors, correlation, and implicit personality theories. The activity can also be modified for use with any personality model, or set of traits; students can also generate additional behavior checklist items of their own based on their discussion. Handout 2.1 is a variation on this activity, listing items that correlated with the five factors according to research that I have collected over the years, in addition to Dollinger’s original items. Working in pairs or small groups, students try to guess which factor correlates with each of the behaviors and what the direction of that correlation is. For example, if people high in Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, or Conscientiousness are likely to engage in the behavior then the correlation is positive. If people low in Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, or Conscientiousness are likely to engage in the behavior, then the correlation is negative (Answers are provided in Handout 2.2.) 6. The Trait Paper Assignment Review Hittner (1999). From the abstract: “A personality trait-based term paper assignment that is appropriate for use in personality psychology courses and that is designed to foster critical thinking skills is introduced. The extent to which the trait questions correspond to generic critical thinking questions is considered, the specific thinking skills induced by each trait question are discussed, and potential limitations of the assignment are noted. Preliminary data are also presented which suggest that the trait-based term paper assignment stimulates critical thinking and enhances knowledge about personality traits. It is hoped that the ideas presented and issues discussed in the present article will encourage academic psychologists from all sub disciplines to develop writing assignments that foster critical thinking skills.” This assignment is not rooted in a particular model of traits and so is adaptable to any model. Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.18CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition7. Open Minded or Purple Haired? In discussing the Big-Five trait theory, I like to make a point that some of the terms students come across may not mean what they think they mean. For example, Openness. Openness involves several components, but one of which is being creative or open to new ideas. We sometimes call this being open-minded in the lay population. So I ask students to describe an open-minded person and also a close-minded person. I chart their observations. Then I point out some common assumptions and errors and we discuss those. For example, students may think someone with purple hair is open minded. So I ask students to explain why they think that person is open minded. And then I challenge them, could it be that that person is simply purple haired but closeminded? Meaning, perhaps the individual is opinionated and not very open to new ideas. Perhaps that individual is rigid in their thinking and stubborn when presented with opposing but valid arguments. Likewise, a very traditional looking person may be one of the most open minded people you can meet. So the lesson is not judging the book by the cover. When we say open minded it really is referring to the mind and the thinking, not the hair color. This is a great opportunity to expose some of our bias and human beings. So we can discuss our biases in this arena and how that can impact our work as scientists. Another example students seem to enjoy has to do with sexual behavior. The question is, if someone enjoys sex with a lot of partners, does this mean they are open minded? Often people think it may. But then I ask students to consider that people who have only one sex partner, or even who abstain, may also be quite open minded. This is a good opportunity to talk about boundaries and that if you have boundaries in your life, and in your relationship, that this may be the product of good mental health. Students soon see how unfair it is to view someone as close-minded simply because they choose to have boundaries in their sexual or personal conduct.Multimedia Resources 1. NPR In Character series http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17914370In Character: Tricksters, Vamps, Heros, Scamps From Darth Vader to Scarlett O'Hara, a series from NPR, explores indelible American characters from fiction, folklore and pop culture. Hear experts discuss the psychology of characters such as Vernon Waters (A Soldier's Story), Willie Stark (All the King's Men), Charlotte (Charlotte's Web), Auntie Mame, Uncle Tom, Henry Fleming (The Red Badge of Courage), The Joker, Norman Bates, Nancy Drew, Jo March (Little Woman), King Kong, Mr. Spock, Carrie (Sex and the City), Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Ricky Ricardo, Charlie Brown, Fred Sanford, Indiana Jones, Dora the Explorer, Mama Rose, Hanibal Lecter, Portnoy, Eric Cartman (South Park), Walter Mitty, Catwoman, Blanche DuBois, Captain Ahab, Barbie, Harriet the Spy, Hester Prynne (The Scarlet Letter), Elmer Gantry, Darth Vader, Gordon Gekko (Wall Street), Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp, Cookie Monster, George Jefferson, Willy Loman (Death of a Salesman), Huckleberry Finn, Scarlett O'Hara, Pollyanna, Holden Caulfield, The Lone Ranger, Lassie, Bugs Bunny, and others.Copyright Š 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.19CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition2. The Five Factors http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miO14kjUNp8Erica Melkonian put this montage together as an independent study project in her AP Psychology class in May of 2011. In it, she defines and illustrates people who are high and low on each of the five factors including the famous and infamous like Curious George and Adolph Hitler (runs 3 mintues, 38 seconds). 3. Sam Gosling: What Your Stuff Says About You http://fora.tv/2008/06/16/Sam Gosling-Snoop The Secret Language of StuffSam Gosling, author of Snoop: The Secret Language of Stuff, presents an overview of his research to the Commonwealth Club of California in this video from 2008. Topics include creativity and openness, Facebook profiles, faking a personal space, and much more. The site includes a biography of Gosling, highlights of the talk, transcript, and the entire talk (1 hour; 7 minutes).Web Resources 1. Take and Score the NEO Personality Inventory http://www.class.uidaho.edu/psyc310/lessons/lesson03/lesson031 homework.htmKenneth Locke at the University of Idaho designed this homework assignment for his psychology of personality class. Students take a 60-item version of the NEO, score it, and think about what it means. 2. International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/j/5/j5j/IPIP/ | NEO Personality InventoryAn online version of the IPIP representation of the NEO personality inventory, this includes both the original and a short version. 3. The HEXACO Personality Inventory–Revised http://hexaco.orgThis inventory measures the six-factor model of personality by Kibeom Lee and Michael C. Ashton. 4. The Geography of Personality http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122211987961064719.html?mod=yhoofront articleTabs interactive-PERSONALITY08Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.20CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian editionThe Wall Street Journal presents this summary of the research by Gosling et al (2008) linking scores on the Five Factor model to living area. The piece includes interactive maps.5. The Big Five Personality Test http://www.outofservice.com/bigfive/Using the Big Five Personality Test site by Oliver P. John at UC Berkeley, find out how you score on the Five Factor Model and participate in on-line research at the same time. This site includes a special section for twins and for friends to rate each other 6. Eysenck’s PEN model http://www.ship.edu/%7Ecgboeree/eysenckminitest.html Eysenck Personality Mini TestStudents can see where they fall on Extroversion, Neuroticism, and Psychoticism in this test posted by George Boeree of Shippensburg University. 7. You Just Get Me: Traits and Trait Perceptions of others http://www.youjustgetme.com/The You Just Get Me website asks visitors. “Do you get people, even if you just met them? Do the people in your life truly get you?” Using the Five-Factor model, respondents answer 43 questions about their personality and try to guess the personality of other visitors. 8. Factor Analysis and Sea Monsters http://www.devpsy.org/teaching/method/factor analysis.htmlKevin Grobman, who maintains the DevPsy.org website, uses the brilliant metaphor of underwater sea monsters in order to help students understand what factor analysis is. Check out his engaging graphics and explanation here. He also includes a link to PowerPoint slides you can use in your own lectures.For Further Reading 1. Sam Gosling and Oliver P. John (1999) Personality dimensions in nonhuman animals: A crossspecies review. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 8(3), 69-75. Do animals have personality? While they may not show Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness or Conscientiousness in quite the same way as humans, you may be surprised at how similar of chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, dogs, cats, and even rats are to humans.Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.21CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian edition2. Daniel Goleman (2007) Social Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books. In this book, Goleman reviews and updates his theory of social intelligence discussing how relationships not only impact our experiences, but also alter our brain chemistry and neuroscience. 3. Kibeom Lee and Michael C. Ashton (2007). Factor analysis in personality research. In R. W. Robins, R. C. Fraley and R. F. Kreuger (Eds.) Handbook of Research Methods in Personality Psychology. New York: The Guilford Press. This excellent, if somewhat advanced, overview of what factor analysis is and how it is used in personality research includes a case study of actual data to walk the reader through the process. 4. Daniel Nettle (2007). Personality: What Makes You the Way You Are. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. This down-to-earth description of the five factor model including genetic and evolutionary explanations, physiological differences, and everyday behaviors includes the Newcastle Personality Assessor to find out where you fall on the five factors. 5. Sam Gosling (2008) Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You. New York: Basic Books. In what ways do we express our personalities and can others reliably judge us? Sam Gosling summarizes his research and the research of others on these interesting questions and teaches you how to become an expert “snooper” by identifying the valid cues.References Dollinger, S. J. (2004). Predicting personality-behavior relations: A teaching activity. Teaching of Psychology, 31(1), 48-51.Fun with Five factors handout. Hittner, J. B. (1999). Fostering critical thinking in personality psychology. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 26, 92-97. Miserandino, M. (2007) Heeeere’s Johnny: A Case Study in the Five Factor Model of Personality, Teaching of Psychology, 34(1), 37-40. Rentfrow, P. J. (2010). Statewide differences in personality: Toward a psychological geography of the United States. American Psychologist, 65, 548-558. Rentfrow, P. J., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2008). A theory of the emergence, persistence, and expression of geographic variation in psychological characteristics. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3(5), 339-369. Segrist, D. J., & Pawlow, L. A. (2007). The mixer: Introducing the concept of factor analysis. Teaching of Psychology, 34(2), 121-123.Handouts Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.22CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian editionHandout 2.1: Behavioral Checklist of the Five Factor Model For each finding below, decide which of the five factors (if any) may correlate with it. Then decide if the correlation is negative or positive. Put a + or a – sign in the box below the factor name. HINT: The number in parentheses after each item tells you how many correlations are significant, as well as whether they are positive or negative.FindingNEOAC1. Ever pulled an all-nighter to complete an assignment (1-) 2. Ever been in counseling or therapy (1+) 3. Read 12 or more books in a year (excluding books assigned for school) (1+) 4. Volunteered to tutor, coach, etc. (2+) 5.Ever been to Florida or Mexico for Spring Break (1+) 6. Ever thrown a party for 20 or more people (1+) 7. Ever composed a poem (not for an assignment) (1+) 8. Ever gotten drunk for the sake of getting drunk (1+) 9. Ever cheated on a spouse/lover/dating partner (1-) 10. Get good grades in school (2+) 11. Engage in risky sexual behaviors (2-, 1+) 12. Alcohol consumption (1+, 1-) 13. Mt Everest climbers (3+, 1-) 14. Happiness and positive affect in everyday life (1+, 1-) 15. Effective leaders (3+, 1-) 16. Life satisfaction (1+, 1-) 17. Remember their dreams at night (1+) 18. Have vivid dreams (1+) 19. Live longer (1+) 20. Develop a cold (1-)Copyright © 2016 Pearson Canada Inc.23CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FULL TEST BANK Instructor’s Manual to accompany Miserandino, Personality Psychology, Canadian editionHandout 2.1: Behavioral Checklist of the Five Factor Model AnswersFindingNEOA1. Ever pulled an all-nighter to complete an assignment (1-) 2. Ever been in counseling or therapy (1+)+3. Read 12 or more books in a year (excluding books assigned for school) (1+)+4. Volunteered to tutor, coach, etc. (2+)+5.Ever been to Florida or Mexico for Spring Break (1+)+6. Ever thrown a party for 20 or more people (1+)+7. Ever composed a poem (not for an assignment) (1+) 8. Ever gotten drunk for the sake of getting drunk (1+)++ +9. Ever cheated on a spouse/lover/dating partner (1-)-10. Get good grades in school (2+)+11. Engage in risky sexual behaviors (2-, 1+)+12. Alcohol c
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