2009 Arctic Cat T570 Snowmobiles Service Repair Manual

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SECTION 1 GENERAL INFORMATION! SPECIFICATIONSTABLE OF CONTENTS General Specifications ............................................ 1-2 Snowmobile Identification…
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SECTION 1 GENERAL INFORMATION! SPECIFICATIONSTABLE OF CONTENTS General Specifications ............................................ 1-2 Snowmobile Identification ..................... .. ....... .. .. ..... 1-2 Recommended Gasoline and Oil ............................ 1-2 Break-In Procedure ................................. ....... .. .. ..... 1-3 Genuine Parts ......................................................... 1-3 High Altitude Operation ......................... .. ....... .. .. ..... 1-3 Drive Chain Lubrication (120 cc) ............................. 1-6 Low Oil Pressure Warning Light (1100 cc) ...... .. ...... 1-6 Preparation For Storage .......................................... 1-6 Preparation After Storage ....................................... 1-7 After Break-In Checkup (100 Miles - 2-Stroke/ 600 Miles - 4-Stroke) ............................................ 1-8 After Break-In Checkup Checklist ........................... 1-9 Engine Specifications (2-Stroke) ........... .. .. ...... .. .... 1-10 Engine Specifications (4-Stroke) ........................... 1-11 Cylinder Head Volume Specifications (2-Stroke) .. 1-12 Engine Piston Travel Versus Crank Angle Chart (2-Stroke) ..................... .. .. ... 1-12 Crankshaft RunoutiRepair Specifications (2-Stroke) ...................................................... .. ... 1-12 Fraction/Decimal Conversions .............................. 1-13 M M/I N. Conversions .............................. .. ....... ... .... 1-13 Torque Conversions (ft-Ib/N-m) ............................. 1-14 Tightening Torque (General Bolts) ........................ 1-14 Assembly Schematics/Torque Specifications (Table of Contents) ............................................. 1-14Engine Torque Patterns (1100 cc) ......................... 1-28 Arctic Power Valve (APV) System Specifications (2-Stroke) .................................... 1-30 Oil Consumption Specifications (2-Stroke) ............ 1-31 EFI Specifications ................................................. 1-31 Throttle Valve Angle Specifications ....................... 1-31 Fuel Pump Specifications (570 cc) ........................ 1-31 Carburetor Specifications ..................... .. .. ...... .. ..... 1-31 Electrical Specifications ........................................ 1-32 Ignition Timing Specifications (2-Stroke) ........ .. .. ... 1-38 Steering/Body Torque Specifications .................... 1-40 Drive System Specifications .................. .. ....... .. ..... 1-41 Drive Clutch/Driven Pulley-Related Specifications ...................................... .. ...... .. ..... 1-41 Arctic Cat Drive Belt Dimensions .......................... 1-41 Drive System Components ................... .. ....... .. ..... 1-41 Gear Case Performance Calibrations ................... 1-42 Drive System Torque Specifications ............... .. ..... 1-43 Rear Suspension Torque Specifications ............... 1-43 Track Warranty Guidelines ............................... ..... 1-45 Track Specifications ............................................... 1-46 Front Suspension Specifications .......... .. .. ...... .. .. ... 1-46 Rear Suspension Specifications ........................... 1-46 Shock Absorber Specifications ............. .. .. ...... .. .. ... 1-47 Idler Wheel Dimensions ........................................ 1-471-1General Specifications -NOTE: General specifications for each 2009 Arctic Cat Snowmobile can be accessed from the Arctic Cat Cat Tracker Dealer Communication System online.Snovvmobile Identification The Arctic Cat Snowmobile has two important identification numbers. The Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) is stamped into the tunnel near the right-side footrest. The Engine Serial Number (ESN) is stamped into the crankcase of the engine.RECOMMENDED GASOLINE (Carbureted Models)The recommended gasoline to use in these snowmobiles is 87 octane regular unleaded. -NOTE: In many areas, oxygenates (either ethanol or MTBE) are added to the gasoline. Oxygenated gasolines containing up to 10% ethanol or up to 15% MTBE are acceptable gasolines; however, whenever using oxygenated gasolines, the carburetor main jet must be one size larger than the main jet required for regular unleaded gasoline. For example, if a 220 main jet is recommended for regular unleaded gasoline, a 230 main jet must be installed if using an oxygenated gasoline.When using ethanol blended gasoline, adding a gasoline antifreeze is not necessary since ethanol will prevent the accumulation of moisture in the fuel system. RECOMMENDED GASOLINE (EFI Models)VINThe recommended gasoline to use in these snowmobiles is 87 octane regular unleaded. In many areas, oxygenates (either ethanol or MTBE) are added to the gasoline. Oxygenated gasolines containing up to 10% ethanol or up to 15% MTBE are acceptable gasolines. Do not use gasolines containing methanol.0726-383-NOTE: The VIN also appears on a decal beneath the seat (CrossfireIM-Series) or attached to the right-side tunnel (remaining models). The decal also displays pertinent production information.These numbers are required to complete warranty claims properly. No warranty will be allowed by Arctic Cat Inc. if the engine serial number or VIN is removed or mutilated in any way.Recommended Gasoline and OilACAUTIONDo not use white gas or gasolines containing methanol. Only Arctic Cat approved gasoline additives should be used.A-NOTE: For optimum performance, do not exceed the recommended 87 octane gasoline. Using a higher octane gasoline will not increase overall performance. -NOTE: The Z1 Turbo models will detect lower octane gasoline and reduced engine performance will result. 91 octane (minimum) gasoline should be used in these models.RECOMMENDED OIL (2-Stroke)The recommended oil to use in the oil-injection system is Arctic Cat 50: 1 Injection Oil (for standard models) or Arctic Cat Synthetic APV 2-Cycle Oil (for APV models). The oil is specially formulated to be used either as an injection oil or as a pre-mix oil (for carbureted model break-in) and meets all of the lubrication requirements of the Arctic Cat snowmobile engine. RECOMMENDED OIL (120 ee)The recommended oil to use is a multi-grade oil calibrated to the ambient temperature at which the engine is run. See the viscosity chart for details.CAUTIONAny oil used in place of the recommended oil may cause serious damage.1-22009 Arctic Cat Snowmobiles Factory Service Manual - all Models - www.ReadManuals.com120 ee Multi-GradeThe Arctic Cat engine requires a short break-in period (approximately 10 operating hours) before being subjected to heavy load conditions or full-throttle operation. Strict adherence to the break-in procedure will contribute to optimum performance and longevity of the engine.SAE #ENGINE OIL ~c-35 -29 -23 -18 "12 -7 1 " 10 15 21 21 32 0 10 20 30 40 SO 60 10 80 90TEMP ~F -30 -.20 -10GEN-0048RECOMMENDED OIL (1100 ee)The recommended oil to use is Synthetic Turbo OW-40 Oil in all temperatures and conditions.Multi-Grade Engine OilDuring break-in, a maximum of 112 throttle is recommended; however, brief full-throttle accelerations and variations in driving speeds contribute to good engine break-in. After the 10 hour break-in period, the snowmobile may be taken to an authorized Arctic Cat Snowmobile dealer for a checkup and oil change at the discretion and expense of the snowmobile owner. 1100 eeThe Arctic Cat engine (when new or rebuilt) requires a short break-in period before the engine is subjected to heavy load conditions. This engine does not require any pre-mixed fuel during the break-in period.ENGINE OIL& -3 0 - 20 - 10 0 1 0 20 30 4 0~TEMP~OC-22 -4 14 32 50 68 86 104OILCHARTJAfter the engine break-in period, the engine oil should be changed every 2500-3000 miles and before prolonged storage.Break-In Procedure 2-STROKEThe Arctic Cat 2-stroke engine (when new or rebuilt) requires a short break-in period before the engine is subjected to heavy load conditions. Arctic Cat requires that the first tankful of fuel be premixed at a 100: 1 ratio in all oil-injection models. During the break-in period, a maximum of 112 throttle is recommended; however, brief full-throttle accelerations and variations in driving speeds contribute to good engine break-in.&CAUTIONDO NOT use premixed fuel in the snowmobile gas tank. Engine damage will occur.To ensure trouble-free operation, careful adherence to the following break-in guidelines will be beneficial. 0-200 miles1/2 Throttle (45 MPH-max)200-400 miles1/2-3/4 Throttle400-600 miles1/2-3/4 Throttle ** With occasional full-throttle operation. To ensure proper engine break-in, Arctic Cat recommends that the engine oil and filter be changed after 600 miles or after one month, whichever comes first. This service is at the discretion and expense of the snowmobile owner.Genuine Parts When replacement of parts is necessary, use only genuine Arctic Cat parts. They are precision-made to ensure high quality and correct fit.High Altitude OperationCAUTIONDO NOT exceed the one (1) tankful limitation of a 100:1 gaS/oil break-in mixture. Continuous use of a gaS/oil mixture, unless consistently operating in extremely cold conditions (-26°C/-15°F or colder), could cause spark plug fouling and excessive carbon buildup. A 100:1 gaS/oil mixture must be used in conjunction with the oil-injection system to ensure adequate engine lubrication in extremely cold conditions.Operating a snowmobile at varying altitudes requires changes in performance components. These changes affect drive train components and carburetion components (570 cc). -NOTE: The 120 cc and 1100 cc turbo do not require calibration changes for varying altitudes.2009 Arctic Cat Snowmobiles Factory Service Manual - all Models - www.ReadManuals.comHigh altitude information decal(s) are located beneath the hood of the snowmobile.ACAUTIONOn carbureted models, carefully follow the Main Jet Chart recommendations for proper main jet selection for altitude, temperature, and gasoline being used.The M-Series snowmobiles are initially set up at the factory for operation between 6000-9000 feet. Consult the appropriate specifications for this information. Following are basic high altitude theories for clutching, engine, suspension, and track. CLUTCHINGAs altitude changes, engine horsepower changes with it. As you go up in altitude, the engine loses horsepower. Because of this, the constant velocity transmission (CVT) system needs to be changed to compensate for the horsepower loss. At altitudes above 5000 ft, clutch engagement RPM is normally higher than the standard setting due to the horsepower loss at altitude as opposed to what would be seen for horsepower at sea level. The engine will lose peak horsepower but will also lose horsepower at engagement speed. For this reason, higher engagement speeds are usually needed at altitude in order to attain acceptable acceleration. This higher engagement speed can be attained several ways. Some of the methods will affect other characteristics of CVT operation, so you must be careful what you change. Drive clutch springs are the most common way to increase engagement speed; however, by simply changing the cam arms to a lighter weight from the heavier sea level cam arm, you will gain some engagement speed. Other more complicated methods exist such as engagement notches and changing the position of the cam arm center of gravity in relation to the roller. This is called "tucking the weight" and can be used, but, like the engagement notch, it can hurt belt life. The driven clutch will also playa part in CVT tuning for high altitude operation. A steeper helix (torque bracket) angle in the driven clutch will mean a quicker up-shift. A shallower angle will mean a slower upshift. If the up-shift is too quick, due to a very steep helix, RPM will be pulled down under the peak operating RPM of the engine (where the horsepower is) and performance will suffer. The engine may even bog. If you have a helix that is too shallow, the engine may over-rev or have poor acceleration. Usually, angles shallower than the sea level calibrations work best. The driven spring will also affect driven clutch tuning. Tighten the spring, and RPM will increase. Loosen the spring, and RPM will decrease. The spring should be used to fine-tune and complement the helix selection.ENGINEA normally aspirated engine will generate more horsepower at sea level than it does at higher altitudes. Many reasons for this are possible, but the biggest reason is that the higher you go, less oxygen is available for the engine to use during its combustion process. Less oxygen means it needs less fuel to obtain the correct air/fuel ratio to operate properly. This is why the fuel ratio has to be recalibrated. High altitude engines operate as though they have a lower compression ratio. This, along with less oxygen and less fuel, means that the engine generates less horsepower. The carbureted models will also have lower pressure applied to the float chamber because of pressure changes in the atmosphere between high altitude and sea level. All of these characteristics will become more evident the higher the altitude. It will be necessary to make changes to the fuel systems (carbureted models) and drive systems that support engine operation as altitude changes.TURBOCHARGINGTurbocharging is one method of compensating for loss of air density that works extremely well when applied to four-cycle internal combustion engines. Exhaust gasses are directed through the turbocharger turbine wheel which is attached to the compressor through a common shaft. As the exhaust gasses spin the turbine, the compressor is spun at very high RPM. Inlet air is drawn into the compressor, compressed, and routed to the intake manifold of the engine. Intake pressure, therefore, is maintained at the optimum level as altitude or temperature increases. The turbocharger output must be regulated to maintain the optimum manifold pressure throughout the designed operating range. This is accomplished by regulating the volume of exhaust gasses passing through the turbine by controlling a diverter valve (waste-gate) at the turbocharger turbine inlet. At lower altitudes/temperatures, excessive exhaust gasses are diverted past the turbine and into the exhaust downstream of the turbocharger thus limiting the compressor output to maintain correct manifold pressure. As altitude increases, the manifold pressure is held constant by diverting less exhaust past the turbine, thus increasing compressor speed. This will continue until the waste-gate is completely closed at which time manifold pressure will start to decrease much the same as a normally aspirated engine. The waste-gate is controlled by a spring/diaphragm mechanism that is connected to the intake manifold by an air line. A mechanical linkage connects the diaphragm to the waste-gate control arm.Carburetor calibration changes for high altitude operation will have an effect on the CVT system and how it operates. Understanding the basics of CVT operation is important in order to make the correct high altitude CVT calibration changes. 1-42009 Arctic Cat Snowmobiles Factory Service Manual - all Models - www.ReadManuals.comAir is heated by friction and compression through the turbocharger and air density is lost by heating the air; therefore, an after-cooler is installed between the turbocharger compressor and the intake manifold. This is an air-to-air after-cooler that uses outside air directed through a radiator-type cooler to cool the compressed air prior to entering the intake manifold.SUSPENSION The different riding styles of the individual operator, the varying snow conditions, and the type of terrain are all factors that affect the suspension at high altitude. Trail riding versus powder snow riding versus combination riding will all require different suspension settings. The normal setting for front ski suspension is as little spring pre-load tension as possible for powder snow riding allowing the skis to float across the snow with the least amount of resistance. Trail riding will require more spring tension to carry the varying load more effectively. Many different settings and spring tensions to consider exist when adjusting for riding style and snow conditions. The rear suspension has a number of spring settings that produce different riding characteristics. The front arm spring and shock will also affect the ride and handling when either on a trail or in powder snow. A strong spring setting on this shock will cause the snowmobile to tend to "dig" more when riding in the powder snow rather than climbing up on top of the snow. But, it will work more effectively when riding on a trail. A softer spring setting will allow the front of the rear suspension to collapse much quicker and change the angle of the track to the snow. A more gradual angle will tend to raise the snowmobile up on the snow rather than digging into it. Many possible variables and adjustments to the rear suspension exist depending on snow conditions, riding style, and type of terrain. These adjustments can be made to individualize the snowmobile to the riding style of the operator.M-Series/Crossfire As snow cover and riding conditions change, several different adjustments can be made to change the ride and handling characteristics for operator preference. Located on the front suspension arm are limiter straps. They limit the amount of "fallout" the front arm can have. These straps may be adjusted in or out due to conditions and riding style. The more the straps are brought up, the more steering power the operator has due to the amount of ski pressure.Another adjustment that can be made on the rear suspension is the front arm shock spring tension. As trail conditions change, the spring pre-load may be used to decrease the chance of the front end "bottoming out." With a stiffer spring pre-load, the ride of the snowmobile will improve on the trail but will affect the performance in the deep powder snow. In deep powder snow, the stiffer spring pre-load will cause the front-end to "dig" and possibly take longer for it to plane off. Several different-rate springs are available for different riding styles and terrain conditions. On the standard models, the front shock springs are also individually adjustable for the terrain conditions and driving style of the operator. The spring adjuster has been set at the factory so the correct amount of threads are exposed between the spring adjuster and the shock housing as an initial setting. Additional ski pressure can be obtained by tightening the spring tension; ski pressure can be decreased by relaxing spring tension. Springs with different spring rates are available for operator choice and snow conditions. A limit exists as to how far you can pre-load the springs before "coil bind" takes effect where the wire on the spring actually runs into itself and causes binding. Equal adjustments should be maintained on both sides of the snowmobile. On the Sno Pro models with air shocks, they are individually adjustable for the terrain conditions and driving style of the operator. The ski shocks are preset at 4.6 kg/cm2 (65 psi) as an initial setting on the Crossfire Sno Pro models or at 4.2 kg/cm2 (60 psi) on the M-Series Sno Pro models. The rear arm shock is preset at 9.8 kg/cm2 (140 psi) on the Crossfire and MSeries Sno Pro models. The shocks can be "finetuned" to match the operator's weight, riding style, and terrain conditions. -NOTE: Care should be taken to have equal pressure in the ski shocks before operating the snowmobile.Finally, track tension should be looked at to make sure that it is within recommended specifications to affect the efficiency of the snowmobile. On models with the torque sensing link, the track is actually tightening as the suspension moves through its range of motion
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